Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

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Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

DJ Maytag
Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

Thanks,
Mitch
Mitch
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Re: Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

Florian Anwander-2
Hi

Am 01.08.2017 um 15:53 schrieb DJ Maytag:
> Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old
> analog poly?

It completely depends on the dedicated synth type.

Florian

--
http://www.florian-anwander.de

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RE: Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

Sam Mims
In reply to this post by DJ Maytag

It depends on what type of keybed it uses.  Which analog poly is it?

 

Sam Mims

Syntaur

 

 

 

From: DJ Maytag [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 8:54 AM
To: AH send
Subject: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

 

Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

 

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

 

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

 

Thanks,

Mitch

Mitch

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Re: Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

Em Wilson
It's a Roland JX10. 


On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

It depends on what type of keybed it uses.  Which analog poly is it?

 

Sam Mims

Syntaur

 

 

 

From: DJ Maytag [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 8:54 AM
To: AH send
Subject: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

 

Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

 

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

 

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

 

Thanks,

Mitch

Mitch




--
    Data you don't have at least two copies of is data you don't care about.

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Re: Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

Em Wilson
Clarification: Mitch posted on a local synth board in Minneapolis stating he might have to make the 5 hour drive over here to snatch it up. I let him know I was going to be in his town in 2 weeks for work anyways, why don't I go take a look at this JX. Scheduled to kick the tires tomorrow. 

On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 1:40 PM, Em Wilson <[hidden email]> wrote:
It's a Roland JX10. 


On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

It depends on what type of keybed it uses.  Which analog poly is it?

 

Sam Mims

Syntaur

 

 

 

From: DJ Maytag [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 8:54 AM
To: AH send
Subject: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

 

Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

 

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

 

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

 

Thanks,

Mitch

Mitch




--
    Data you don't have at least two copies of is data you don't care about.




--
    Data you don't have at least two copies of is data you don't care about.

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Re: Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

w.james.meagher
In reply to this post by Em Wilson
I did quite a detailed rundown of refurbing my JX10 keybed and aftertouch on the SuperJX Facebook group. I'll try to find you a link when I get home from work. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 1, 2017, at 13:40, Em Wilson <[hidden email]> wrote:

It's a Roland JX10. 


On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

It depends on what type of keybed it uses.  Which analog poly is it?

 

Sam Mims

Syntaur

 

 

 

From: DJ Maytag [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 8:54 AM
To: AH send
Subject: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

 

Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

 

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

 

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

 

Thanks,

Mitch

Mitch




--
    Data you don't have at least two copies of is data you don't care about.

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Re: Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

DJ Maytag
Ah, I see Em is indeed on here as well!

Yes, I was speaking of the JX-10 (I don't usually talk about things publicly until they actually happen, it's a superstitious thing). I had always wanted a JX-8P but Darwin Grosse had once suggested I take a look at the JX-10 instead, mainly because of the keyboard (at the time of the recommendation, I didn't own any velocity sensitive keys). Ironic that it could happen, and the keys are potentially a mess!

My shopping cart of parts I need from Syntaur is getting pretty big, Sam! We'll have to see how exactly many rubber key contact strips this thing will need.

Thanks for the vids and Super JX group recommendation!

Mitch
On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 1:59 PM <[hidden email]> wrote:
I did quite a detailed rundown of refurbing my JX10 keybed and aftertouch on the SuperJX Facebook group. I'll try to find you a link when I get home from work. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 1, 2017, at 13:40, Em Wilson <[hidden email]> wrote:

It's a Roland JX10. 


On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

It depends on what type of keybed it uses.  Which analog poly is it?

 

Sam Mims

Syntaur

 

 

 

From: DJ Maytag [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 8:54 AM
To: AH send
Subject: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

 

Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

 

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

 

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

 

Thanks,

Mitch

Mitch




--
    Data you don't have at least two copies of is data you don't care about.

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RE: Re: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

Sam Mims
The JX-10 keybed is not too difficult to clean up.  Each key presses onto a rubber contact strip, the carbon nubs of which bridge two points on a circuit board, thus telling the synth to play that note.  These specific strips have two nubs per note, one slightly higher than the other, and the difference in time between one and the other making contact gives an indication of the velocity at which the key was struck. 
 
To do a tidy-up on the keybed, it's easy to remove all of the keys, then remove all of the contact strips.  Note that the contact strips are oriented in a certain direction - it is possible to put them in backwards.  So make a note on how they are positioned.  The two nubs per note are slightly different, and that is what needs to be correctly oriented.  The top-most strip is unique - it spans 13 notes, and can only go in one way.  So you can use that one to see how those nubs should be oriented in the other strips.
 
A sink full of warm water with dish soap will do a good job of washing the keys and contact strips.  The strips shouldn't need more than a good swishing around, and you can use a sponge on the keys, if necessary.  Then lay them all out on a towel to dry.
 
If the key contact board (the circuit board) is really nasty, you can give it a bath too.  Or if it's not all grimy, you can use rubbing alcohol on a cotton swab to clean the contact points.  A tiny bit of grit here can cause a key not to play.  Or it can cause it to only play at maximum velocity.
 
Once everything is dry, you can put it back together, and the cleaning may have solved all of your woes.  Or, you may find that certain notes still do not play.  If this is the case, you can swap contact strips around, and see if the bad note moves (faulty contact strip) or stays in the same place (dirty or faulty contact board).  The carbon nubs on the contact strips wear out, and get less conductive over time; if they look glassy, they may need to be replaced with new ones.
 
It is possible, by the way, to test notes with the keys removed - just press on the contact strip with your finger and that note should sound.
 
Good luck!
 
Sam Mims
Syntaur
 
 
 
--------- Original Message ---------
Subject: Re: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?
From: "DJ Maytag" <[hidden email]>
Date: 8/1/17 9:14 pm
To: [hidden email], "Em Wilson" <[hidden email]>
Cc: "Sam Mims" <[hidden email]>, "AH send" <[hidden email]>

Ah, I see Em is indeed on here as well!

Yes, I was speaking of the JX-10 (I don't usually talk about things publicly until they actually happen, it's a superstitious thing). I had always wanted a JX-8P but Darwin Grosse had once suggested I take a look at the JX-10 instead, mainly because of the keyboard (at the time of the recommendation, I didn't own any velocity sensitive keys). Ironic that it could happen, and the keys are potentially a mess!

My shopping cart of parts I need from Syntaur is getting pretty big, Sam! We'll have to see how exactly many rubber key contact strips this thing will need.

Thanks for the vids and Super JX group recommendation!

Mitch
On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 1:59 PM <[hidden email]> wrote:
I did quite a detailed rundown of refurbing my JX10 keybed and aftertouch on the SuperJX Facebook group. I'll try to find you a link when I get home from work. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 1, 2017, at 13:40, Em Wilson <[hidden email]> wrote:

It's a Roland JX10. 
 

On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

It depends on what type of keybed it uses.  Which analog poly is it?

 

Sam Mims

Syntaur

 

 

 

From: DJ Maytag [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 8:54 AM
To: AH send
Subject: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

 

Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

 

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

 

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

 

Thanks,

Mitch

Mitch



 
--
Data you don't have at least two copies of is data you don't care about.
 
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Re: Re: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

DJ Maytag
Thanks for the info, Sam! I had seen some videos about cleaning the keys up, but a more thorough explanation is definitely handy to have!

Em picked up the JX-10 last night, and the keys that supposedly didn't work, did work with a bit of pressure. We're hoping it just needs some contact cleaning to be good to go. If not, well you've definitely added onto the list of things to order from Syntaur!

Thanks,
Mitch
On Wed, Aug 2, 2017 at 12:13 AM <[hidden email]> wrote:
The JX-10 keybed is not too difficult to clean up.  Each key presses onto a rubber contact strip, the carbon nubs of which bridge two points on a circuit board, thus telling the synth to play that note.  These specific strips have two nubs per note, one slightly higher than the other, and the difference in time between one and the other making contact gives an indication of the velocity at which the key was struck. 
 
To do a tidy-up on the keybed, it's easy to remove all of the keys, then remove all of the contact strips.  Note that the contact strips are oriented in a certain direction - it is possible to put them in backwards.  So make a note on how they are positioned.  The two nubs per note are slightly different, and that is what needs to be correctly oriented.  The top-most strip is unique - it spans 13 notes, and can only go in one way.  So you can use that one to see how those nubs should be oriented in the other strips.
 
A sink full of warm water with dish soap will do a good job of washing the keys and contact strips.  The strips shouldn't need more than a good swishing around, and you can use a sponge on the keys, if necessary.  Then lay them all out on a towel to dry.
 
If the key contact board (the circuit board) is really nasty, you can give it a bath too.  Or if it's not all grimy, you can use rubbing alcohol on a cotton swab to clean the contact points.  A tiny bit of grit here can cause a key not to play.  Or it can cause it to only play at maximum velocity.
 
Once everything is dry, you can put it back together, and the cleaning may have solved all of your woes.  Or, you may find that certain notes still do not play.  If this is the case, you can swap contact strips around, and see if the bad note moves (faulty contact strip) or stays in the same place (dirty or faulty contact board).  The carbon nubs on the contact strips wear out, and get less conductive over time; if they look glassy, they may need to be replaced with new ones.
 
It is possible, by the way, to test notes with the keys removed - just press on the contact strip with your finger and that note should sound.
 
Good luck!
 
Sam Mims
Syntaur
 
 
 
--------- Original Message ---------
Subject: Re: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?
From: "DJ Maytag" <[hidden email]>
Date: 8/1/17 9:14 pm
To: [hidden email], "Em Wilson" <[hidden email]>
Cc: "Sam Mims" <[hidden email]>, "AH send" <[hidden email]>

Ah, I see Em is indeed on here as well!

Yes, I was speaking of the JX-10 (I don't usually talk about things publicly until they actually happen, it's a superstitious thing). I had always wanted a JX-8P but Darwin Grosse had once suggested I take a look at the JX-10 instead, mainly because of the keyboard (at the time of the recommendation, I didn't own any velocity sensitive keys). Ironic that it could happen, and the keys are potentially a mess!

My shopping cart of parts I need from Syntaur is getting pretty big, Sam! We'll have to see how exactly many rubber key contact strips this thing will need.

Thanks for the vids and Super JX group recommendation!

Mitch
On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 1:59 PM <[hidden email]> wrote:
I did quite a detailed rundown of refurbing my JX10 keybed and aftertouch on the SuperJX Facebook group. I'll try to find you a link when I get home from work. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 1, 2017, at 13:40, Em Wilson <[hidden email]> wrote:

It's a Roland JX10. 
 

On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

It depends on what type of keybed it uses.  Which analog poly is it?

 

Sam Mims

Syntaur

 

 

 

From: DJ Maytag [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 8:54 AM
To: AH send
Subject: [AH] Keybed cleaning on a poly? Easy or major PITA?

 

Just curious how easy it is or isn't to fix/clean a keybed on an old analog poly? Working out a deal on something, but a bunch of keys on the lower octave don't work and one key in the middle doesn't work.

 

It doesn't sound like a repeating pattern that might indicate a voice issue, so without even having looked at it yet, it seems like a keybed cleaning might be the issue?

 

I already have a 106 that is in need to some TLC (voice/Wave/filter chips), a Prophet-600 that might need a new membrane panel, and an SH-101 & MG-1 that both need all new sliders/knobs/switches. Trying to avoid adding one more broken synth to the bench, if it's going to be a costly and/or time consuming repair.

 

Thanks,

Mitch

Mitch



 
--
Data you don't have at least two copies of is data you don't care about.
 
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