Minimoog Service

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
54 messages Options
123
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Minimoog Service

Quincas Moreira
Hey friends :)

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.
I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up :)

Thanks in advance for any advice!

--
Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Kyle Jarger

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.
I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

jkjelec
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Quincas Moreira
That´s great info , thanks Kyle!

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Kyle Jarger <[hidden email]> wrote:

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.
I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

jkjelec



--
Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Larry Dee Church

Sooooo many things about the model D.  One common iddy biddy mistake happens frequently when removing the keyboard.  The left hand controller has to be removed first.  When re-assembling note that the sheet metal panel extends slightly past the wooden part at the back of the assembly.  That extension slips into a slot in the case.  It is easy to overlook the proper insertion causing misalignment of the two screw holes at the front of the assembly.  A significant percentage of the D’s out there have two sets of holes – one, the proper placement, and the other set – slightly in front of the originals caused by forcing the screws in when the assembly is still not quite inserted all the way due to that sheet metal extension not properly inserted into the slot.  Lift up on the back a wee bit while pushing in until you feel it slide in another 1/8” or so.

 

Speaking of removing the keyboard – restoring the key contact performance to 100% is sometimes problematic.  First, it is important to verify that the key CV contact closes before the gate contact as each key is depressed.  Buss bars and contact springs are often bent out of position for whatever reason and may need adjustment.  If the gate closes first with the CV contact open then the resulting pitch glides up until the CV contact closes.  Contact resistance on the gate bar never seems to be a problem but the CV contact can be glitchy and those surfaces are not easy to clean.  The coiled spring contacts can easily be bent out of shape when carelessly scrubbed.  The buss bar is hard to aggressively scrub with the spring contacts in the way.  I prefer to remove the CV buss bar and polish with some Deoxit.  When replacing the bar it should be rotated to a different position so the CV springs have a fresh point of contact on the bar.  When removing the buss bar avoid de-soldering from the grommet that holds it in place on the plastic stand-off.  Instead, heat the grommet until the solder is melted.  Then wait just long enough for the solder to solidify.  The stand-off plastic is soft, and when the grommet is heated it can be pulled loose from the plastic leaving the grommet soldered to the buss bar.  If you attempt to suck out the solder and slide the bar thru the grommet you will smear solder over the gold plated surface and you will probably pull the grommet out of the stand-off anyway.  When replacing the bar after polishing you will have the key assembly turned upside down and it is possible that keys could be depressed. When you slide the bar back thru the stand-offs it will be on the wrong side of the contact of a depressed key.  Don’t do that!  Slide the bar all the way thru until the grommet contacts the first stand-off.  Heat the grommet and carefully insert back into the plastic allowing the heated metal to melt its way into to the flush position on the stand-off.  With a little practice you can execute this process without any appearance that the bar was ever removed. 

 

And yes, the spacer blocks are two different thicknesses for front and rear positions.  I never can remember if the thicker ones go to the front or the rear, so I have to check and make sure every time. 

 

Guy formerly known as Technician Larry

Larry D Church

Dee C Designs

 

From: Quincas Moreira [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 6:32 AM
To: Kyle Jarger <[hidden email]>
Cc: analogueheaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

That´s great info , thanks Kyle!

 

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Kyle Jarger <[hidden email]> wrote:

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec



 

--

Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Lorne Hammond
In reply to this post by Kyle Jarger

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Lorne Hammond
In reply to this post by Larry Dee Church

Larry is right about the left block. In working with or removing the key assembly I take off the base plate and the stand the whole thing on the controller side and swing the main electronics forward to make a stand out of it.  Bit of foam helps compensate and support the hinge but its a very solid hinge anyway.

Then I can play the problem notes and look underneath at the same time to see what is right and wrong in the mechanical end of the bus bar contacts. Visual inspection tells you a lot about the problem.

 

Lorne

From: Larry Dee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 8:09 AM
To: 'Quincas Moreira' <[hidden email]>; 'Kyle Jarger' <[hidden email]>
Cc: 'analogueheaven' <[hidden email]>
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Sooooo many things about the model D.  One common iddy biddy mistake happens frequently when removing the keyboard.  The left hand controller has to be removed first.  When re-assembling note that the sheet metal panel extends slightly past the wooden part at the back of the assembly.  That extension slips into a slot in the case.  It is easy to overlook the proper insertion causing misalignment of the two screw holes at the front of the assembly.  A significant percentage of the D’s out there have two sets of holes – one, the proper placement, and the other set – slightly in front of the originals caused by forcing the screws in when the assembly is still not quite inserted all the way due to that sheet metal extension not properly inserted into the slot.  Lift up on the back a wee bit while pushing in until you feel it slide in another 1/8” or so.

 

Speaking of removing the keyboard – restoring the key contact performance to 100% is sometimes problematic.  First, it is important to verify that the key CV contact closes before the gate contact as each key is depressed.  Buss bars and contact springs are often bent out of position for whatever reason and may need adjustment.  If the gate closes first with the CV contact open then the resulting pitch glides up until the CV contact closes.  Contact resistance on the gate bar never seems to be a problem but the CV contact can be glitchy and those surfaces are not easy to clean.  The coiled spring contacts can easily be bent out of shape when carelessly scrubbed.  The buss bar is hard to aggressively scrub with the spring contacts in the way.  I prefer to remove the CV buss bar and polish with some Deoxit.  When replacing the bar it should be rotated to a different position so the CV springs have a fresh point of contact on the bar.  When removing the buss bar avoid de-soldering from the grommet that holds it in place on the plastic stand-off.  Instead, heat the grommet until the solder is melted.  Then wait just long enough for the solder to solidify.  The stand-off plastic is soft, and when the grommet is heated it can be pulled loose from the plastic leaving the grommet soldered to the buss bar.  If you attempt to suck out the solder and slide the bar thru the grommet you will smear solder over the gold plated surface and you will probably pull the grommet out of the stand-off anyway.  When replacing the bar after polishing you will have the key assembly turned upside down and it is possible that keys could be depressed. When you slide the bar back thru the stand-offs it will be on the wrong side of the contact of a depressed key.  Don’t do that!  Slide the bar all the way thru until the grommet contacts the first stand-off.  Heat the grommet and carefully insert back into the plastic allowing the heated metal to melt its way into to the flush position on the stand-off.  With a little practice you can execute this process without any appearance that the bar was ever removed. 

 

And yes, the spacer blocks are two different thicknesses for front and rear positions.  I never can remember if the thicker ones go to the front or the rear, so I have to check and make sure every time. 

 

Guy formerly known as Technician Larry

Larry D Church

Dee C Designs

 

From: Quincas Moreira [[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 6:32 AM
To: Kyle Jarger <[hidden email]>
Cc: analogueheaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

That´s great info , thanks Kyle!

 

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Kyle Jarger <[hidden email]> wrote:

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec



 

--

Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Larry Dee Church
In reply to this post by Lorne Hammond

A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  

 

With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

 

From: Lorne Hammond [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:18 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Sam Mims

Unless it’s going to sit in a museum without ever being turned on, I can’t imagine not correcting electronic problems that would (for me at least) render it non-playable.  I’m all for keeping icons like this in original condition, but it’s an instrument, and unless you can play it, it then becomes only an artifact.  Replacing electronic components with identical parts will not decrease the value in my eyes.  (Assuming, of course, it is done correctly and cleanly.)

 

Sam Mims
Syntaur

 

 

 

From: Larry Dee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:25 AM
To: 'Lorne Hammond'; [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  

 

With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

 

From: Lorne Hammond [[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:18 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Minimoog Service

Lorne Hammond
In reply to this post by Quincas Moreira

and the service manual is excellent on tuning both versions.  Do talk them into bushings, and they will thank you.

Lorne

 

From: Quincas Moreira [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-05-17 8:32 PM
To: analogueheaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: [AH] Minimoog Service

 

Hey friends :)

 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up :)

 

Thanks in advance for any advice!

 

--

Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Quincas Moreira
In reply to this post by Sam Mims
You guys rock, I´m touched :)

Thanks for all the invaluable info!  Boy, I should have quoted a higher fee though, really thought this was gonna be a simple job!
Anyways, I´ll keep you all posted, thanks again!

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 10:33 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

Unless it’s going to sit in a museum without ever being turned on, I can’t imagine not correcting electronic problems that would (for me at least) render it non-playable.  I’m all for keeping icons like this in original condition, but it’s an instrument, and unless you can play it, it then becomes only an artifact.  Replacing electronic components with identical parts will not decrease the value in my eyes.  (Assuming, of course, it is done correctly and cleanly.)

 

Sam Mims
Syntaur

 

 

 

From: Larry Dee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:25 AM
To: 'Lorne Hammond'; [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  

 

With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

 

From: Lorne Hammond [[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:18 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec




--
Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Lorne Hammond
In reply to this post by Larry Dee Church

If you are talking about an RA Moog then yes I'd stop  at once. Proceed slowly if you do proceed. A real one option is leave it alone and do not play it. 

 

But if its say a serial number 3,000 and up garden variety then bad caps are bad caps in my book.

My decision on 1% was after 40 years of personal ownership, with punk synth band stickers all over the back and misaligned holes drilled by a younger stupider me to access all 3 vcos with cascading switch jacks.

So it was an owners call because 35 year old capacitors... its not fine wine, it is about ground noise, and power supply issues and brightness of waveforms eroding. Mine sounded better.

The 1% matched should only be changed if they off spec, and even Tempcos will go off spec.  If they are off spec  it will not tune well. 

 

Caveat most amateur tunings are bad, (metal screwdriver, tuning when cold, lack of patience, unsteady hand etc) so don't automatically replace those matched parts cause you are bad at tuning. 

When you get to tuning, don't even start till its been on for 30-40 minutes and stabilized.  Prepare to take an hour, less if your experienced and you have a frequency counter on your bench. When they say you will have to go back and forth

in the manual they mean it.

 

So look, lift and measure those 1% resistors if you must and then decide.  I decided I owed the machine and Kevin was selling his last sets and I was recapping anyway.

 

The lovely thing about the Mini are all those open back waveform switches.  Kevin said he didn't replace he just moved to the not worn second set of contacts on those double switches.

Brilliant.  And for the sealed ones, Allen and Bradley are sooo good. Careful cleaning might be all it takes.  I doubt they are worn out because they are factory industrial/mil spec  grade pots

as old school for quality as you can get.

 

Lorne

 

From: Larry Dee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 8:25 AM
To: 'Lorne Hammond' <[hidden email]>; [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  

 

With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

 

From: Lorne Hammond [[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:18 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Lorne Hammond
In reply to this post by Quincas Moreira

Quincas:  I can say I learned from every Minimoog I worked on so don't worry about the fee.  Seen great (asr to pitch VCO 3) and awful mods too.

 

Lorne

 

From: Quincas Moreira [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 8:53 AM
To: Sam Mims <[hidden email]>
Cc: Larry Dee <[hidden email]>; Lorne Hammond <[hidden email]>; analogueheaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

You guys rock, I´m touched :)

 

Thanks for all the invaluable info!  Boy, I should have quoted a higher fee though, really thought this was gonna be a simple job!

Anyways, I´ll keep you all posted, thanks again!

 

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 10:33 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

Unless it’s going to sit in a museum without ever being turned on, I can’t imagine not correcting electronic problems that would (for me at least) render it non-playable.  I’m all for keeping icons like this in original condition, but it’s an instrument, and unless you can play it, it then becomes only an artifact.  Replacing electronic components with identical parts will not decrease the value in my eyes.  (Assuming, of course, it is done correctly and cleanly.)

 

Sam Mims
Syntaur

 

 

 

From: Larry Dee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:25 AM
To: 'Lorne Hammond'; [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  

 

With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

 

From: Lorne Hammond [[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:18 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec



 

--

Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Quincas Moreira
Thanks Lorne.  Its SN#19091
The owner wants to play it, so not touching it is not really an option. The only truly qualified service guy in Mexico City takes years to deliver, so some people are starting to come to me...  I just did a Korg VC-10 and swapped the encoders on a Machinedrum, both turned out fine.
I´m not experienced at servicing, but I have 5 years of SDIY under my belt, so that should count for something :)
I don´t think i need to replace anything on it other than some knobs. It is very well in tune, just needs a tiny tweak. Mostly some key contacts are glidey, so I´ll refer to Larry´s tips for that :)
I´m charging less than 100 usd for this, thinking it would take me about three hours to do, but I´m guessing it´ll be a little longer now that I have more info!

Thanks again!

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 11:13 AM, Lorne Hammond <[hidden email]> wrote:

Quincas:  I can say I learned from every Minimoog I worked on so don't worry about the fee.  Seen great (asr to pitch VCO 3) and awful mods too.

 

Lorne

 

From: Quincas Moreira [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 8:53 AM
To: Sam Mims <[hidden email]>
Cc: Larry Dee <[hidden email]>; Lorne Hammond <[hidden email]>; analogueheaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

You guys rock, I´m touched :)

 

Thanks for all the invaluable info!  Boy, I should have quoted a higher fee though, really thought this was gonna be a simple job!

Anyways, I´ll keep you all posted, thanks again!

 

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 10:33 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

Unless it’s going to sit in a museum without ever being turned on, I can’t imagine not correcting electronic problems that would (for me at least) render it non-playable.  I’m all for keeping icons like this in original condition, but it’s an instrument, and unless you can play it, it then becomes only an artifact.  Replacing electronic components with identical parts will not decrease the value in my eyes.  (Assuming, of course, it is done correctly and cleanly.)

 

Sam Mims
Syntaur

 

 

 

From: Larry Dee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:25 AM
To: 'Lorne Hammond'; [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  

 

With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

 

From: Lorne Hammond [[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:18 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec



 

--

Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular




--
Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Lorne Hammond

I use pipe cleaners that I can shape into a loop with a slight gap. I dip the loop into my deoxit bowl (vent fumes always) and then I can hook it around the bus bar with the bad contact and clean the bus bar with gentle pressure. When I do this I play to identify the bad notes, put a bit of painter's tape on the key end so i don't fix a good key, just the bad one, take the plate off, and with a blanket on the bench put it on end and power off just look quickly at the action of good versus bad keys. Push back on any loose plastic caps, make sure the physical action is the same as a good one.  Next I dip my fuzzy pipecleaner (or foam tip disposable swab in deoxit or 99% rubbing alcohol and hook around the bus bar and gently rub it clean.  If I see dirt on it, good! You do not want to scratch the gold plating so gently. Avoid Q-tip cotton swabs as the cotton fibres catch on wires and springs.  

Then I power if on and hear if its better.  If it is, I stop and reassemble.  Miminalism is good if it fixes the issue.  The more you do if inexperienced the better chance of making things worse. Small steps.

 

The best way, Kevin's way, is desolder the bus bar extract, polish on a wheel with light jeweller's rouge, reassemble  and resolder. A cheat on that one is a slight rotation of the bus bar to an unused contact side of the bus bar.

 

I would just fix the bad contacts, tune, return it to the happy customer. This should only involve taking the bottom plate off, and tuning with the back on.

 

One other point of issue is sometimes the keyboard connector under the modwheel plate. If it has no plastic wrap on it someone has opened it in the past. Pull it apart, and with a used toothbrush clean the pins, air dry and reinsert and put a nylon tie on it.

 

And emphasize that if they care about action next time you could do the bushings for hourly at X and cost. 

Shops often double parts cost (shipping finding costs you. Or other techs who are independent order double the amount and charge it all to the customer to build up parts inventory for urgent jobs.

 

Time yourself fixing this.  Set an hourly rate. Cost parts. Treat it like a business.  I have seen several techies collapse mentally over too many jobs piling up from people who want cheap bills and high end work delivered immediately.

Think proefssionally about your skill and time if you want to do this at a more than helping out friends.  I have avoided doing it as business and still interesting machines find me. 

 

Lorne

 

From: Quincas Moreira [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 9:59 AM
To: Lorne Hammond <[hidden email]>
Cc: Sam Mims <[hidden email]>; Larry Dee <[hidden email]>; analogueheaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Thanks Lorne.  Its SN#19091

The owner wants to play it, so not touching it is not really an option. The only truly qualified service guy in Mexico City takes years to deliver, so some people are starting to come to me...  I just did a Korg VC-10 and swapped the encoders on a Machinedrum, both turned out fine.

I´m not experienced at servicing, but I have 5 years of SDIY under my belt, so that should count for something :)

I don´t think i need to replace anything on it other than some knobs. It is very well in tune, just needs a tiny tweak. Mostly some key contacts are glidey, so I´ll refer to Larry´s tips for that :)

I´m charging less than 100 usd for this, thinking it would take me about three hours to do, but I´m guessing it´ll be a little longer now that I have more info!

 

Thanks again!

 

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 11:13 AM, Lorne Hammond <[hidden email]> wrote:

Quincas:  I can say I learned from every Minimoog I worked on so don't worry about the fee.  Seen great (asr to pitch VCO 3) and awful mods too.

 

Lorne

 

From: Quincas Moreira [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 8:53 AM
To: Sam Mims <[hidden email]>
Cc: Larry Dee <[hidden email]>; Lorne Hammond <[hidden email]>; analogueheaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

You guys rock, I´m touched :)

 

Thanks for all the invaluable info!  Boy, I should have quoted a higher fee though, really thought this was gonna be a simple job!

Anyways, I´ll keep you all posted, thanks again!

 

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 10:33 AM, Sam Mims <[hidden email]> wrote:

Unless it’s going to sit in a museum without ever being turned on, I can’t imagine not correcting electronic problems that would (for me at least) render it non-playable.  I’m all for keeping icons like this in original condition, but it’s an instrument, and unless you can play it, it then becomes only an artifact.  Replacing electronic components with identical parts will not decrease the value in my eyes.  (Assuming, of course, it is done correctly and cleanly.)

 

Sam Mims
Syntaur

 

 

 

From: Larry Dee [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:25 AM
To: 'Lorne Hammond'; [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  

 

With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

 

From: Lorne Hammond [[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 8:18 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas:

 

also pay close attention to the insulated washers when you take out the boards.  One board uses a double set for spacing reasons.  I keep a camera handy when dissassembling.

The tip on erasers and the gold edge contacts is a tried and true tip. You just want them to shine, not be abraided.  Do minimal spray solvents due to residue.  Plastic shaft screwdrivers when tuning

not metal as its delicate work.  I once made a tool for that by xing a knitting needle but now they can be bought more easily.  And tuning with a freq counter then by ear is faster on the earlier numbers (2/3rds of production).

 

If its a deep overhaul recap all, and matched exact 1% precision resistors are very much part of tight tuning. Check for values that have drifted they are on the right of the vco board I think. I put in a set I got from Kevin Lightner in

my personal one.  But of the 6-8 I have worked on I found all minimoogs had their own character.

 

Usually its just cleaning contacts, a return to tuning, and the big impact after that is simple: new key bushings.

 

Lorne   

 

From: Kyle Jarger [[hidden email]]
Sent: May-06-17 6:21 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

 

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.

I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

 

jkjelec



 

--

Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular



 

--

Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Brian Willoughby
In reply to this post by Larry Dee Church
You raise some good points, Larry.

With the Model D in current production, I would think that this fact makes the remaining original Model D more likely to be sought by purists who do not want alterations. Anyone who doesn’t care about “no mods” would likely just buy a new Model D under warranty.

Another important fact to note is that Quincas tells us he has no experience working on a Model D. Personally, I would not want a recapping to be done by a first-time repair engineer. No offense intended to Quincas, but I think that the “less is more” axiom applies here, and very much so. Don’t fix anything that isn’t actually broken.

Brian


On May 6, 2017, at 8:24 AM, Larry Dee <[hidden email]> wrote:
> A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  
>  
> With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Quincas Moreira
no offense taken, I do not plan to recap unless I see a bulging power cap...
I´m just gonna sort out the key contacts, tune it and return to customer ;)

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 1:39 PM, Brian Willoughby <[hidden email]> wrote:
You raise some good points, Larry.

With the Model D in current production, I would think that this fact makes the remaining original Model D more likely to be sought by purists who do not want alterations. Anyone who doesn’t care about “no mods” would likely just buy a new Model D under warranty.

Another important fact to note is that Quincas tells us he has no experience working on a Model D. Personally, I would not want a recapping to be done by a first-time repair engineer. No offense intended to Quincas, but I think that the “less is more” axiom applies here, and very much so. Don’t fix anything that isn’t actually broken.

Brian


On May 6, 2017, at 8:24 AM, Larry Dee <[hidden email]> wrote:
> A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!
>
> With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..




--
Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Brian Willoughby
Sounds like fun! I’d love to work on an old Model D. You’ll learn a lot.

Brian


On May 6, 2017, at 11:41 AM, Quincas Moreira <[hidden email]> wrote:

> no offense taken, I do not plan to recap unless I see a bulging power cap...
> I´m just gonna sort out the key contacts, tune it and return to customer ;)
>
> On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 1:39 PM, Brian Willoughby <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> You raise some good points, Larry.
>>
>> With the Model D in current production, I would think that this fact makes the remaining original Model D more likely to be sought by purists who do not want alterations. Anyone who doesn’t care about “no mods” would likely just buy a new Model D under warranty.
>>
>> Another important fact to note is that Quincas tells us he has no experience working on a Model D. Personally, I would not want a recapping to be done by a first-time repair engineer. No offense intended to Quincas, but I think that the “less is more” axiom applies here, and very much so. Don’t fix anything that isn’t actually broken.
>>
>> Brian
>>
>>
>> On May 6, 2017, at 8:24 AM, Larry Dee <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> > A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!
>> >
>> > With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..
>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

John Emond-2
In reply to this post by Quincas Moreira
Just to reiterate, bushing replacement makes a huge difference. I once restored a mini with pieces of foam rubber (black stuff for through hole ICs) tacked on to level the keys. Somehow the bus bars were seriously eroded as well. The rotation technique saved having to get them replated. They are robustly built and relatively simple; but they can be time-consuming to get right.

Cheers,

John

Monde Synthesizer gives you More

On May 6, 2017, at 9:32 AM, Quincas Moreira <[hidden email]> wrote:

That´s great info , thanks Kyle!

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Kyle Jarger <[hidden email]> wrote:

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.
I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

jkjelec



--
Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

John Emond-2
To be clear, I removed the black foam kludge and replaced the bushings.

Monde Synthesizer gives you More

On May 6, 2017, at 3:44 PM, John Emond <[hidden email]> wrote:

Just to reiterate, bushing replacement makes a huge difference. I once restored a mini with pieces of foam rubber (black stuff for through hole ICs) tacked on to level the keys. Somehow the bus bars were seriously eroded as well. The rotation technique saved having to get them replated. They are robustly built and relatively simple; but they can be time-consuming to get right.

Cheers,

John

Monde Synthesizer gives you More

On May 6, 2017, at 9:32 AM, Quincas Moreira <[hidden email]> wrote:

That´s great info , thanks Kyle!

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Kyle Jarger <[hidden email]> wrote:

Quincas Moreira wrote: 

I was just hired to service a Model D. Just need cleaning of key contacts, pots and switches, tuning and callibration.
I´ve never done this, so I figured I´d ask you experienced folk to just tell me anything you think I should know before I open it up 

FWIW-If you need to take the keyboard assembly out, there is one or a stack of wood blocks that set the exact height of the keybed in the housing. I was told that these are stacked/assembled in a specific orientation so as to make the height perfect.  So using a marker, draw a line from the top to the bottom of one stacked set and two lines from the top to bottom of the other, so that when you re-install the keybed, the blocks and stacks are put back in the same orientation. 

jkjelec



--
Quincas Moreira
Test Pilot at VBrazil Modular
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Minimoog Service

Larry Dee Church
In reply to this post by Brian Willoughby
The customer I describe liked the "playability" of the RA Moog just fine.  It did not have any power supply issues or any other degradation from the original performance and he wanted it to stay that way for the rest of its pampered life in a Los Angeles recording studio.   I can understand about tolerating some thermally related pitch drift and re-tuning the front panel when changing VCO octaves.  I can't understand dealing without the zero return mod for the pitch bend wheel.  Seems that is likely to degrade important tracks down the line when a "wheel man" tries to record a good solo.   But then being a bit out of tune is part of the charm, no?  Well, no - not for me if I'm the producer.  

And Brian - absolutely - don't fix anything if it is not broken.  Glad somebody else feels that way.  I've seen too much devastation caused by incompetent hands swapping out parts unnecessarily.  

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Willoughby [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, May 06, 2017 11:39 AM
To: Larry Dee Church <[hidden email]>
Cc: Analog Heaven <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [AH] Re: Minimoog Service

You raise some good points, Larry.

With the Model D in current production, I would think that this fact makes the remaining original Model D more likely to be sought by purists who do not want alterations. Anyone who doesn’t care about “no mods” would likely just buy a new Model D under warranty.

Another important fact to note is that Quincas tells us he has no experience working on a Model D. Personally, I would not want a recapping to be done by a first-time repair engineer. No offense intended to Quincas, but I think that the “less is more” axiom applies here, and very much so. Don’t fix anything that isn’t actually broken.

Brian


On May 6, 2017, at 8:24 AM, Larry Dee <[hidden email]> wrote:
> A few years back I serviced and sold a very early Mini for a customer whose brother had the keyboard in the closet since 1979.  The buyer I found who was willing to pay top $ for it was VERY strong on NO MODIFICATIONS.  Forget that the pitch drifts, that pitch bend center detent comes back plus or minus 15 or 20 cents, that VCO octave switches interact, etc. etc.  NO MODS!  
>  
> With this in mind I have to wonder how recapping or precision resistor substitutions might alter the value down the line.  Opinions please…..




123